Nevada Surrogacy Law

Important Legal Changes and What You Need to Know

If you look at current Nevada surrogacy law, you will notice changes to neutrality to marital status and compensation for gestational surrogates.

Since 1995, attorney Eric A. Stovall has assisted clients with surrogacy, including both the intended parents, as well as the gestational carrier. In that time, he has seen our surrogacy laws evolve as technology changed. In October of 2013, new surrogacy laws went into effect that concern Nevadans involved in potential surrogacy arrangements. Nevada surrogacy attorney Eric A. Stovall understands the differences between the old and new surrogacy laws. Thus, he knows how to apply these laws to protect your rights. The following surrogacy law information highlights important issues for intended parents and a gestational surrogate.

What You Need to Know About Nevada Surrogacy Law

Since its enactment, Assembly Bill No. 421 addressed many issues regarding surrogacy in Nevada. However, it is important to recognize what the new law has and has not affected, such as:

  • The bill is neutral for both marital status and gender.
  • The old law only provided legal coverage for the parentage of sperm donors. The new law now includes coverage for egg and embryo donations, as well. Donors do not receive any rights to the child, but those who receive the donations do have rights under the law.
  • There was a narrow definition in the old law regarding “intended parents” as being married. There was also a narrow definition for the sperm and egg donors. However, the new law permits intended parents (both married and unmarried) and individuals to use gestational carrier arrangements.
  • Both the old and new surrogacy laws prevent traditional surrogacy.
  • The new law provides coverage to same-sex partners and LGBT couples looking to utilize a surrogate.
  • In the old law, it was illegal for gestational carriers to gain compensation. The new surrogacy law authorizes payments for some expenses in addition to compensation to women who act as surrogates.
  • The new surrogacy law requires all the parties in a gestational carrier agreement to retain separate legal representation.

Find a Nevada Surrogacy Attorney

There are additional, important changes that may affect your gestational surrogacy. Call Eric A. Stovall, Ltd. today for support. We help our clients with surrogacyadoption and parental rights issues from our Las Vegas and Reno offices.